top of page

Practise or Practice


In British English, there is a difference in spelling between "practice" and "practise". Both words have the same meaning, but they are used in different contexts and have different spellings depending on whether they are being used as a noun or a verb.


"Practice" with a ‘c’ is a noun that refers to the actual doing of something, such as a profession or a skill. For example, "He had a lot of practice playing the piano before his big performance." In this sentence, "practice" is used as a noun because it refers to the actual act of playing the piano.


On the other hand, "Practise" with an ‘s’ is a verb that means to perform or to exercise a skill or profession. For example, "She needs to practise her driving before taking her driving test." In this sentence, "practise" is used as a verb because it refers to the action of performing the skill of driving.


Here are some more examples to illustrate the difference between the two words:

  • "It took a lot of practice to be this good at football." (noun)

  • "I will practise my public speaking skills by attending Toastmasters meetings." (verb)

  • "She has a lot of practice playing tennis because she plays every day." (noun)

  • "He needs to practise his guitar skills before his concert next week." (verb)


It's important to note that in American English, the spelling is the same for both the noun and the verb. "Practice" is used for both the noun and the verb, which can lead to confusion for those who are used to the British spelling conventions.


In summary, "practice" and "practise" are both valid spellings, but they are used in different contexts. In British English, "practice" is a noun and "practise" is a verb.



9 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Comments


bottom of page